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Listen up Celebrity Tweeters! Apparently Nobody Cares! September 27, 2010

Posted by billyburnettgbc in conversational PR, new media, Online Reputation, pr, TweetVolume, Twitter.
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Twitter plans to launch a free analytics dashboard that will help its users – especially businesses – understand how others are interacting with their tweets. Announced by Ross Hoffman, a member of Twitter’s business development team, the tool will show you which tweets are spreading and which users are influential in your network.

Although bad news for third-party Twitter analytics tools, such as Klout, Omniture and Twitalyzer, it is likely to be welcomed by many as a step forward in the way we measure the beast that is social media – especially as it’s free!

Twitter is perhaps one of the best examples of the difficulties surrounding social media measurement, with retweets, followers and the ability for a topic to trend all playing a role in determining influence.

Only this week, Ashton Kutcher, one of the services most famous users with millions of followers, shown to have very little if any influence according to a study conducted at Northwestern University. These findings hit the wire a few months after social media analytics company Sysomos claimed that celebrities’ followers don’t have any influence, either.

It might all depend on how you crunch the numbers. Don’t forget that Justin Bieber used to consistently sit near the top of Twitter’s official trends list, and that one source close to Twitter claimed 3% of the network’s servers are dedicated to tweets from Bieber and the retweets from his followers.

Although the launch of this service is unlikely to be considered the defacto standard by every PR or marketing agency, especially as some have already invested in developing their own tools, it does provide an independent view for the client.

The beautiful (and highly social) game June 14, 2010

Posted by kewroad in Facebook, Twitter, Uncategorized, video, YouTube.
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by Sophie

Now that the whole nation is well and truly immersed in World Cup fever, I thought it might be interesting to take a look at how we’re keeping ourselves up to speed with the latest updates and news.   It’s been two years since the latest major football tournament (Euro 2008) and oh how the media landscape has changed in this time.  More traditional forms of communications have paved the way for apps, videos, fan pages, Twitter feeds.  So for all of you that haven’t already dumped England off at the first hurdle, here we take a look at three of the best ways to follow the beautiful game:

1. On the 1 June, the FA launched their biggest campaign to date in an effort combine the public’s enthusiasm for football with actual participation.  This has included a Facebook app where users can create their own Official England Shirt and then post it as their profile picture.  You’ll have to move fast to get the number you want though. 24 has been taken by Stuart Pearce, 25 by Ray Winstone, 30 by Stephen Fry and 67 by Nick Clegg.  Other numbers include 66 by the Bobby Moore foundation, 2012 by The Olympics and 2018 by Back the Bid

2.Twitter has launched their official World Cup Tracking page.  Twitter staff select the most interesting tweets using the hashtag tool and algorithms.  You can also view the latest country updates by clicking on the flag of choice.

3.Video had to feature in this list – so here you go!  If you’ve missed any of the action or fancy a cheeky lunchtime watch of any of the games go to Footytube.  It’s not completely new for the World Cup – you can watch league teams (even smaller ones) in action – but they have a dedicated World Cup page so that you can make sure that you’ve always got some good footy knowledge to share down the pub at the end of the day.

So, great news for us – these are just three of the many ways we can stay up to date with all the action via social media.  Check out Mashable’s Social media hub here

 

 

Not so great news for our players where the teams from Spain, Brazil, Mexico, Holland, Germany, Argentina and England are forbidden to use any social media tools including sites like Twitter! Shame, would have been interested to see what Green would have tweeted after Saturday’s match.

David vs Goliath Starring Google as David With guest appearances from Facebook and Twitter in the role of Goliath February 12, 2010

Posted by kewroad in Facebook, Google, social networks, Twitter.
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In the online world Google is undoubtedly seen as a giant among mere mortals, but in some arenas this is far from the case. I am talking about the social media scene where Facebook and Twitter are leading the way and Google is running along behind trying to keep up as best it can.

The weapon Google has chosen in place of the traditional slingshot is Google Buzz, a new add-on for Gmail that, as they put it, will ‘Go beyond status messages’. Users of this new service will be able to share all types of info from photos and videos through to websites within the existing Gmail service.

Using their existing email system may seem a strange option as platforms like Twitter and Facebook have made their mark on the world by moving away from emails and using instant messaging and other quicker forms of communication. By integrating with Gmail, Google gains instant access to 176 million existing email subscribers, some will just see this as another email add on and not a threat to the social media status quo but others may see this as a sleeping lion, waiting for Google to yank its tail and start a social media revolution.

With a host of failed attempts at social media in their past including Orkurt, Dodgeball, Jaiku, and OpenSocial some may think this latest effort is destined to failure. But I am also sure that a few years ago people would have laughed at you if you asked when they last Tweeted and who their celebrity doppelganger on Facebook was.

Google certainly doesn’t look like they are ready to give up on the social media scene just yet and even if they are the David of the piece for now I would not be surprised if a growth spurt and promotion to Goliath is not far off.

140 Words on Twitter Becoming the Word of the Year 2009 December 2, 2009

Posted by kewroad in blogs, internet, social networks, Twitter.
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Twitter:

  • The sound of a succession of chirps as uttered by birds
  • A free social networking and micro-blogging service

Not so long ago there was only one meaning for the word Twitter, but this year the brand name of a micro-blogging powerhouse has been crowned most popular word of 2009, joining previous winners change, hybrid, sustainable and refugee.

2009 is the first year that a technology brand rather than a political issue has topped the chart.

Other developments in 2009 have included Darlington becoming the first UK town to have an official ‘Twitterer-in-Residence’ who will be paid £140 annually to inform people about news and events in town via Twitter (@TheDarloBoard). There is also a man who has hooked his house up to Twitter to let him know when he has forgotten to turn his lights off (@andy_house).

Twitter hits PR agencies – guess what it’s called: twitpitch November 25, 2009

Posted by kewroad in 2009 predictions, blogs, conversational PR, internet, Journalism, pr, Twitter.
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Twitter makes the world go round and probably provides more opportunities than people can think of right now. Not only journalists, bloggers and analysts find a new communication channel in the 140 characters space that Twitter offers. Companies start to talk to their clients, partners, best friends and potential new clients about new products, the market or other hot issues. PR agencies like us try to introduce the advantages of  Twitter to our clients and we try hard even in “far-behind-Germany”.

Now as part of the PR community we can make Twitter a new business channel for us as well. We start twittering in our community and talk about PR news, discuss issues and get quick feedback from other agencies of our thematic focus. And this network could lead to new contacts for our business. Watch us twitpitching!

Bettina

GBC Germany

The internet now drives opinion not the print media October 18, 2009

Posted by kewroad in 2009 predictions, information technology, internet, Journalism, new media, pr, print media, social networks, Twitter, Uncategorized.
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The furore since Thursday evening over the Daily Mail’s Jan Moir’s take on the death of Stephen Gateley serves to demonstrate that communications and opinion is no longer in the hands of journalists alone.  Twitter not only ‘breaks news’ – it also provides the facilitate to quickly garner masses of public opinion around news.   In the old days, a journalist would express a view and all that might happen is a letter from Mr Angry from Bournementh in the letters page the following week.   Many of might have wanted to comment but didn’t have the inclination to write a letter.  Not only does the popularity of Facebook and Twitter  now enable people to comment instantly but these social media tools also enable us to come together collectively, quickly and forcefully to drive comment and lead opinion.

Is this new wave of influential public opinion revolutionary? Well almost.  When before could a swell of opinion be expressed so quickly and powerfully? Long-term, this must have a positive effect on the old powers of the handful of media moguls who have long domintated the printing presses. Surely, long-term, it will be public opinion that drives the news agenda.  This new power of the people can’t be underestimated. Such was the rumpus caused by the Daily Mail article that the  newspaper lost significant advertising revenue. The mail had to remove adverts from big brands like Marks and Spencer, Nestle, Visit England, Kodak and the National Express. 

As the Observer recently reported, the print media is changing beyond all recognition and will never be the same again. We are currently living in a period of incredible change in communications and social media. No one really knows what the outcome will be, all that is for sure is that it won’t be the same as before. 

Sue Grant

AOL Goes Out with A Twitter August 20, 2009

Posted by kewroad in internet, ISP, Twitter.
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Woke up this morning to find my AOL connection was kapput. After some DIY kit testing I realised my WLAN, DSL and claptop were AOK but the Internet was dead.  Discovering whether it was a big outage or just my personal bit of the Internet  was something of a trial. When I got online in the office, no alerts on technical support page, found  UK message boards have been culled and web chat was down for “improvements”.  Other than a cryptic message on the technical support line, I found out the scale of the problem through a quick experiment in crowdsourcing via Twitter. On a day when some media are turning cold on Twitter’s value,  I found that all that useless babble was invaluable and the  best way to find out exactly what was going on. Thank you Twitter

Silly Season dominated by (mostly) Madcap Twitter Stories August 11, 2009

Posted by kewroad in Journalism, pr, social networks, Twitter.
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We’re in the midst of the UK media silly season. Serious news is supposed to be off the agenda because politicians and the media have gone on their long summer  holidays. Of course there are grim exceptions to this rule – war, famine, recession, disaster stories still retail well in the dog days of the summer.

Silly season stories are silly by definition (explains the elephant in a pit story doing the tabloid rounds). But there’s a  rich rash of Twitter silly season stories this year too. One good example spotted by the Daily Bulldog is Jackson-related. The other is less bonkers but has PR silly season written all over it – The Twitter Opera.  (NB  Royal Opera claims Twitter will help it reach a younger audience. But have’t they read all of the reports on Twitter’s user base being largely wellheeled, middle class and middle aged? Their deal with The Sun was more ground breaking but that was so last year)

Nothing wrong with this. In fact if you care about the media and it sells papers then all of this silliness is seriously a good thing.

Save the Observer? August 5, 2009

Posted by kewroad in Journalism, Twitter, Uncategorized.
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I wasn’t surprised to hear Guardian Media Group was weighing up whether to kill off the Observer. Having the read the paper for most of my life, recently I had stopped buying it – partly because I find the Saturday Guardian a better Weekend read, partly because Sunday newspaper stories depress me and second outside of the main news section everything else was pretty dismal (sorry Nigel Slater who is a food writer god but somehow he’s lost his mojo in the magazine – though the food magazine is very good). What I love about the Observer is its contrarian attitude e.g. on the Iraq war and I am ashamed that I stopped picking up the blessed thing. To make amends I and you should sign up to the Twitter  appeal and buy a copy this Sunday

Twitter: Next Generation of Citizen Journalism? June 30, 2009

Posted by billyburnettgbc in Journalism, new media, Twitter.
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I didn’t learn of Michael Jackson’s death on the news, nor did I read it in a newspaper or online, I heard about it on Twitter, the fastest growing medium of so-called citizen journalism.

I was in a public house near my flat and as a friend frequented the little boy’s room I took the opportunity to load up Tweet Deck on my iPhone.  I was suddenly met with over 300 “MJ related” Tweets, with an assortment of hash tags and tiny URLs which I could use to follow the story.  This was citizen journalism in action and I became part of it the minute I decided to Retweet and subsequently break the internet.

As the fastest growing website in the UK, experiencing a 22-fold increase in the past year, Twitter is now not only used by many for communication, but also as a source of news.  This is supported by a recent study by industry analysts Hitwise, who found that during May, links from Twitter accounted for 1 in every 350 visits to a website.  The figures also revealed that Twitter was the 27th most popular source of traffic to media and newspaper websites in the UK.

But is this a sustainable medium, not in terms of enthusiastic users but in terms of quality?  On the same day that I learnt of the news surrounding Michael Jackson, Tweets were also circulating around the death of Jeff Goldblum, culminating in an Australian news channel covering the news.  A term we are referring to internally as Tweeting Whispers.

Another challenge facing the use of Twitter as a source of news is the opportunity for misuse. Habitat has hit the headlines over the past couple of weeks when an overenthusiastic “intern” decided to leverage the popularity of hash tags surrounding the Iran elections and Apple iPhone to promote a special offer by Habitat.  On this occasion the site was simply misused to promote a special offer, but what if it was to send people to an infected website etc.

The challenge for Twitter is on how to address these problems. Does it put in place technical solutions that could potentially inhibit growth and functionality?  Or does it leverage the Twitter audience and create a new system of rating or reporting tweets?

The task ahead is unenviable however there is no doubt without some action from a predominantly unchanged social networking platform the Twitter platform will be replaced.  I am already thinking of a tool where you aren’t allowed to use vowels.